What Is Minimally Invasive Surgery?

What does minimally invasive surgery mean?

Minimally invasive surgery allows your surgeon to use techniques that limit the size and number of cuts, or incisions, that they need to make. It’s typically considered safer than open surgery. You’ll usually recover more quickly, spend less time in the hospital, and feel more comfortable while you heal.

In traditional open surgery, your surgeon makes one large cut to see the part of your body that they’re operating on. In minimally invasive surgery, your surgeon uses small tools, cameras, and lights that fit through several tiny cuts in your skin. This allows your surgeon to perform surgery without opening a lot of skin and muscle.

Some minimally invasive surgeries are done with robotic technology that allows more precise control over the surgery. Other minimally invasive surgeries are done without robotic assistance.

Keep reading to find out about different types of minimally invasive surgeries, the conditions that can be treated, and the benefits and risks of each type by AMRI hospital‘s specialist.

For this purpose, AMRI widely regarded as the leading laparoscopic Surgery hospital in India. The Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery at AMRI provide a wide array of services, few of which include:

  1. Endoscopy
    Endoscopy is a minimally invasive diagnostic tool, used to view the inside of organs, inspect for abnormalities and take biopsies. A small camera and light source are mounted onto a flexible tube which can be inserted into the mouth (to inspect the esophagus, stomach and duodenum) or the anus (to inspect the large bowel).
  2. Upper Endoscopy
    Upper endoscopy is usually performed to evaluate symptoms of persistent upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or difficulty swallowing. It is also the best test for finding the cause of bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract.

Upper endoscopy is more accurate than x-ray films for detecting inflammation, ulcers, or tumors of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum. Upper endoscopy can detect early cancer and can distinguish between benign and malignant conditions when biopsies of suspicious areas are obtained. Biopsies are taken for many reasons and do not necessarily mean that cancer is suspected.

Upper endoscopy is also used to treat conditions present in the upper gastrointestinal tract. A variety of instruments can be passed through the endoscope that allow many abnormalities to be treated directly with little or no discomfort, for example, stretching narrowed areas, removing polyps (usually benign growths) or swallowed objects, or treating upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Safe and effective endoscopic control of bleeding has reduced the need for transfusions and surgery in many patients.

3. Laparoscopy
Laparoscopic surgery is performed through small incisions. A telescope with a video camera inserted through one incision provides visualization of the operation on a TV monitor. Surgical instruments are then passed through additional small incisions, and the entire operation takes place completely within the patient’s body. When the telescope is used to operate on the abdomen, the procedure is called laparoscopy. When used in the chest, the procedure is called thoracoscopy.

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